MILFORD — One of Jay Reason’s first jobs was working at a record store — and now he’s set to open one of his own that he hopes will become a destination spot.

Reason’s store — Static Era — held a preview opening last week at 43 River St., and will officially open on Oct. 16. The shop will, of course, offer records, but he said it’ll also have a medley of different merchandise — from band T-shirts and hoodies to Super7 and Funko toys and soaps from South Africa.

The business’ name — a nod to the Misfits’ album “Static Age” — is also the same as one of Reason’s labels, Static Era Records, which launched about a year ago. Reason, a Milford resident who has previously been in the bands, Voice of Reason and The Distance, also has another label called Wargod Collective.

“The storefront is basically an extension of the labels I do, but obviously carrying major label releases, new stuff, toys,” he said. “It’s really just like an illusion of the business and kind of adapting with what’s happening out there with no live shows and no outlets to sell products for some of the bands that we put out in the releases I do.”

Reason wants it to be a community space where people could come and go, even if they’re not necessarily purchasing something. It’ll be “really crazy looking,” he said, with decorations like a piece of art lit up with UV lights.

“Even if you’re not a record fan, if you saw the space before and just come in, your mind is going to be blown,” Reason said. “Without revealing too many secrets, I’ve done a lot of work to the space and there’s all kinds of cool little neat things to look at. I think people will trip out, for sure.”

And when it comes to the records they’ll sell, Reason emphasized they’ll have a wide selection, including “top-40 stuff, hip hop, rock, metal.” He said they’ll also have exclusive colors for vinyls that are special to the Milford location.

“I can special order just about anything anybody wants. We have accounts with every major distributor,” he said. “I can also help track down any records — we work with a network of record buyers and collectors, so if somebody had like a white whale on their list, depending on what their budget is, I can definitely do that, too.”

He said one of his goals is to have his own vinyl pressing machine at some point so people could watch the record-making process unfold and shop, “very similar to Jack White’s Third Man record stores in Detroit and in Nashville.”

For now, though, he’s just “really excited” to get started.

“I’m stoked on the challenge to do it in a time like this,” he said.

Static Era will be open Fridays and Saturdays from noon to 6 p.m., starting Oct. 16.