HARTFORD >> State Rep. Pam Staneski (Milford & Orange) today announced she will be participating in a bipartisan group which will educate lawmakers on the value of manufacturing in the state.

Staneski attended the first 2015 meeting of the Manufacturing Caucus on Friday, Jan. 30, at the State Capitol. Members of the Manufacturing Caucus will meet regularly to discuss the consequences that new legislation may have on manufacturing and job creation.

Many employers still struggle to fill certain types of vacancies, especially for so-called middle-skills jobs — in computer technology, nursing, high-skill manufacturing, and other fields — that require postsecondary technical education and training and, in some cases, college math courses or degrees.

“I worked for 10 years in manufacturing before joining the teaching profession. I want to bring my background to this caucus and help the manufacturing industry in my district and the state,” said Rep. Staneski. “Many manufacturing employers struggle to fill certain types of vacancies, especially for so-called middle-skills jobs such as in computer technology, nursing, high-skill manufacturing, and other fields. We need to develop a way to educate our young adults in these middle-skilled jobs that currently require postsecondary technical education and training and, in some cases, college math courses or degrees.”

According to a Connecticut Industrial Energy Consumers report, manufacturing contributed $25.9 billion to the gross state product and accounts for about 11.4 percent of the state’s total employment.

“Talking to manufacturers in my district they tell me Connecticut needs to reduce the costs of job creation and job retention. I am encouraged at the Manufacturing Caucus’ enthusiasm and bipartisan tone,” Staneski said. “We all share common interests and goals for our state economy. We want to grow Connecticut manufacturing jobs. Let’s build on that. We need to work together to create a climate which allows them to thrive. We have the potential to be the ‘right place’ for manufacturing. Through this caucus, we can make a lot of progress in solving the problems that we hear about from manufacturers.”

The 70-member Manufacturing Caucus was first created in May, 2012; about 50 members are state legislators, and another 20 are industry advocates and business lobbyists.