Even Halloween — a holiday steeped in lore, joy and a lot of candy — could not escape the ongoing COVID-19 crisis unscathed.

Guidance from Gov. Ned Lamont discourages traditional trick-or-treating, and with capacity and distance restrictions placed on classes in Stamford and Greenwich schools, typically festive harbingers such as class parties or school costume parades are a bust.

But for some families, there’s still been hope for the holiday. Museums throughout Fairfield County have stepped up to the challenge by planning events to keep families safe, sane and a little spooked.

“Halloween clearly looks very different this year,” said Megan Brown, youth and family programs manager at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich. “One thing families are looking to us for is to get out, especially while it's still relatively safe, to go somewhere safe.”

Brown hopes families can celebrate the holiday with the museum’s Tricks ‘n’ Treats at the Bruce, scheduled for both Halloween and the day after. The event will feature a themed scavenger hunt and take-home bags full of treats and crafts for children to do at home.

But planning a socially distanced event for excited children on a holiday crammed with sweets and mischief wasn’t easy. There are timed admissions throughout the days to prevent crowding, and families must make reservations to attend, according to Brown.

The scavenger hunt was most difficult to plan, since it involves people freely bustling about. To keep attendees spaced out, organizers devised an event in which children and their guardians can find answers to the hunt in multiple spaces throughout the Bruce. The pandemic also prompted staff to brainstorm some remote activities for the Halloween kits, in order to minimize the amount of time people spend inside the Bruce.

“Part of that too is making the craft take home with instructions in the Halloween kits they’ll be getting, so that they can have some time out, get some experience, have some hands-on fun in the building while looking at something different,” said Brown. “And then, getting candy.”

The Stamford Museum and Nature Center also reimagined some festive fall favorites for the socially distant times this year.

“Our Trick-or-Treat on the Farm is a beloved annual event here at the SM&NC. This year has featured a new take on this traditional favorite,” said Kristin Sinatra, director of external affairs for the Stamford Museum & Nature Center. “Rather than hosting a small number of large sessions, we’ve opted instead to run seven individual sessions each limited to 20 children for a small group experience in this era of social distancing.”

The museum has been running a series of outdoor movies throughout the summer and fall months as well. This weekend, staff is pairing the Halloween classic “Hocus Pocus” with a “safe trunk-or-treat” along with Riley Volvo Cars in Stamford.

Sinatra said families have relished in the opportunity to be outside and with other people, even if six feet apart.

Residents can register for Tricks ‘n’ Treats at the Bruce and the Stamford Museum & Nature Center’s showing of “Hocus Pocus” online. Face masks are required, in accordance with state coronavirus guidelines.